Visions of a Freeman - Friday, December 06 of 2013
BBC News genocide against Venezuelan people.

So he goes the BBC once again:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-25230752
7 December 2013 Last updated at 01:37 GMT
High stakes in Venezuela's municipal elections
By Irene Caselli
BBC News, Caracas

The stakes will be high for both the government and the opposition in Venezuela's municipal elections on Sunday.

According to David Smilde, a senior fellow at the Washington Office on Latin America, the results of the vote for mayors and town councillors will be a test of the government's popularity.

"This is the first election since April, when Nicolas Maduro just barely squeaked by," he says referring to April's presidential election when Mr Maduro won by an unexpectedly narrow margin of 1.5 percentage points.

The opposition, led by Henrique Capriles, contested the result, alleging there had been irregularities. But the National Electoral Council carried out a recount and declared the results valid.

Dividing forces

The country became more divided than ever in the wake of the vote.

Opposition supporters questioned the legitimacy of the new president, while Chavistas - as supporters of the late President Hugo Chavez are known - accused the opposition of trying to stage a coup.

The municipal elections could be an indication of how voters feel eight months on, but analysts think there is little chance of there being a clear winner.

"Both sides may be able to declare victory on 9 December, depending on what you define as victory," says Eugenio Martinez, an election analyst working for the pro-opposition newspaper El Universal.

"There are 337 different elections on Sunday" he says referring to the number of mayoral posts up for grabs.

According to most polls, the government coalition looks likely to win in a majority of municipalities.

What is less clear is whether it will be able to take control of the country's two largest cities, Caracas and Maracaibo.

Bigger picture

But both the government and the opposition have argued in their campaigns that Sunday is about much more than choosing local representatives.

From the start, the opposition has portrayed the vote as a referendum on the performance of Mr Maduro, whom it blames for Venezuela's economic woes.

The government, on the other hand, wants to be able to show it can count on the support of the voters at a difficult economic time.

Victory is therefore important to both camps, but the stakes seem higher for the opposition.

"The opposition trapped itself," says Julio Escalona, Venezuela's Deputy Ambassador to the United Nations.

"They told their voters that these are decisive elections. But they may not win, and that would become a serious political problem for them," he told BBC News in a telephone interview from New York City.

Mr Smilde also believes the opposition has been losing ground.

"Until the end of October, it looked like the opposition was in the driver's seat," he says.

'Special powers'

With an annual inflation rate of 54.3%, shortages of food staples and frequent power cuts, dissatisfaction with Mr Maduro had been on the rise.

"But then things changed," Mr Smilde explains.

In early November, the president ordered the seizure of a chain of electronics stores, accused them of overcharging, and forced them to slash their prices.

Later that month, the National Assembly granted Mr Maduro special decree powers that allow him to pass laws without the assembly's approval for 12 consecutive months.

Polls suggest that soon after, a large majority of Venezuelans started viewing the president's work as positive, leaving the opposition on shakier grounds.

A convincing victory for the government could spell the end of Mr Capriles as leader of the opposition coalition, according to Mr Smilde.

Another defeat could make it hard for him to hold together the coalition of 30 often divided parties.

'No fair play'

Ignacio Avalos, who heads the Venezuelan Electoral Observatory, a NGO which has often been critical of the government, says the opposition has been facing an added difficulty.

"The worry is that the campaign was very uneven, there was no fair play," he says.

Among other things, Mr Maduro declared 8 December as a day to commemorate the memory of the late president Hugo Chavez.

The government says it chose 8 December as the "Day of Loyalty and Love towards Chavez and the Motherland" because it is the first anniversary of Mr Chavez's famous speech, when he announced the re-occurrence of his cancer and asked voters to pick Mr Maduro as the new president if he were not to return from cancer treatment in Cuba.

In a statement, the Venezuelan Electoral Council said Venezuelans "are facing the risk that the commemorative acts and events may become acts aiming at recruiting votes for the candidates supported by the executive power".

"The principles of equity and equality established in our legislation would thus be violated," the statement warns.

But analysts say that despite the recent polls suggesting increased approval of the president's performance, the government coalition may not fare much better in Sunday's election than in its razor-thin win in April.

Some critics say a poor performance could lead to internal divisions within Chavismo..

But Mr Escalona thinks a partial defeat will only spur the government on in its performance.

"If the government loses the main cities, it means that they will have to do a better job in the future," he assures.

"Chavez's legacy still has a vital importance within Chavismo.. I don't see any reason for a political fracture. There are many reasons to remain united," he says.

Election analyst Eugenio Martinez agrees that the onus on Sunday is on the opposition:

"No matter the result, [Nicolas] Maduro will remain the president. But the opposition needs this victory to show its strength," he says.

Let me start with the Yellow letters, the ones that basically talk about two conflicting equal parts:

barely squeaked by
Dividing forces
more divided than ever
little chance of there being a clear winner
two largest cities
serious political problem for them
powers
power cuts
slash
without the assembly's approval
divided parties
very uneven
power
equity and equality established in our legislation would thus be violated

internal divisions
political fracture

Now take a look:

opposition
opposition
Opposition
opposition
pro-opposition
opposition
opposition
opposition
opposition
opposition
opposition
opposition
opposition
opposition
opposition
opposition

Take a look again:

government
government's
government
government
government
government
government
government
government
government


Let me tell you some important things:

1) There is no such thing as a Government party in Venezuela.

For example Henrique Capriles, which is mentioned at that news is the Governor of the State of Miranda and as a Governor he is of course part of the Government.

In Venezuela there are two groups of political parties, the MUD (Mesa de Unidad Democratica) and the PSUV (Partido Socialista Unido de Venezuela). Those are the words that any ethical, non criminal journalist should have used if they even cared a little bit about being objective and properly inform people.

The "Common" was severely violated.

2) There is no such thing as an Opposition party in Venezuela.

It is also illogical because in the case of Capriles, the Governor of the state of Miranda the opposite party would be the PSUV, which would be it's opposition...

So we are having two imaginary forces that do not exist and also lack their proper names.

How can someone even make a news about something and not even name it?

I will explain why later.

Anyway this is how the News would look if the ethical rules of Common were respected (Proper Academic Media with Ethics):
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-25230752
7 December 2013 Last updated at 01:37 GMT
High stakes in Venezuela's municipal elections
By Irene Caselli
BBC News, Caracas

The stakes will be high for both the PSUV (Unified Socialist Party) and the MUD (Table of Democratic Unity) in Venezuela's municipal elections on Sunday.

According to David Smilde, a senior fellow at the Washington Office on Latin America, the results of the vote for mayors and town councillors will be a test of the PSUV's popularity.

"This is the first election since April, when Nicolas Maduro just barely squeaked by," he says referring to April's presidential election when Mr Maduro won by an unexpectedly narrow margin of 1.5 percentage points.

The MUD, led by Henrique Capriles, contested the result, alleging there had been irregularities. But the National Electoral Council carried out a recount and declared the results valid.

Dividing forces

The country became more divided than ever in the wake of the vote.

MUD supporters questioned the legitimacy of the new president, while Chavistas - as supporters of the late President Hugo Chavez are known - accused the MUD of trying to stage a coup.

The municipal elections could be an indication of how voters feel eight months on, but analysts think there is little chance of there being a clear winner.

"Both sides may be able to declare victory on 9 December, depending on what you define as victory," says Eugenio Martinez, an election analyst working for the pro-MUD newspaper El Universal.

"There are 337 different elections on Sunday" he says referring to the number of mayoral posts up for grabs.

According to most polls, the PSUV coalition looks likely to win in a majority of municipalities.

What is less clear is whether it will be able to take control of the country's two largest cities, Caracas and Maracaibo.

Bigger picture

But both the PSUV and the MUD have argued in their campaigns that Sunday is about much more than choosing local representatives.

From the start, the MUD has portrayed the vote as a referendum on the performance of Mr Maduro, whom it blames for Venezuela's economic woes.

The PSUV, on the other hand, wants to be able to show it can count on the support of the voters at a difficult economic time.

Victory is therefore important to both camps, but the stakes seem higher for the MUD.

"The MUD trapped itself," says Julio Escalona, Venezuela's Deputy Ambassador to the United Nations.

"They told their voters that these are decisive elections. But they may not win, and that would become a serious political problem for them," he told BBC News in a telephone interview from New York City.

Mr Smilde also believes the MUD has been losing ground.

"Until the end of October, it looked like the MUD was in the driver's seat," he says.

'Special powers'

With an annual inflation rate of 54.3%, shortages of food staples and frequent power cuts, dissatisfaction with Mr Maduro had been on the rise.

"But then things changed," Mr Smilde explains.

In early November, the president ordered the seizure of a chain of electronics stores, accused them of overcharging, and forced them to slash their prices.

Later that month, the National Assembly granted Mr Maduro special decree powers that allow him to pass laws without the assembly's approval for 12 consecutive months.

Polls suggest that soon after, a large majority of Venezuelans started viewing the president's work as positive, leaving the MUD on shakier grounds.

A convincing victory for the government could spell the end of Mr Capriles as leader of the MUD coalition, according to Mr Smilde.

Another defeat could make it hard for him to hold together the coalition of 30 often divided parties.

'No fair play'

Ignacio Avalos, who heads the Venezuelan Electoral Observatory, a NGO which has often been critical of the PSUV, says the MUD has been facing an added difficulty.

"The worry is that the campaign was very uneven, there was no fair play," he says.

Among other things, Mr Maduro declared 8 December as a day to commemorate the memory of the late president Hugo Chavez.

The PSUV says it chose 8 December as the "Day of Loyalty and Love towards Chavez and the Motherland" because it is the first anniversary of Mr Chavez's famous speech, when he announced the re-occurrence of his cancer and asked voters to pick Mr Maduro as the new president if he were not to return from cancer treatment in Cuba.

In a statement, the Venezuelan Electoral Council said Venezuelans "are facing the risk that the commemorative acts and events may become acts aiming at recruiting votes for the candidates supported by the executive power".

"The principles of equity and equality established in our legislation would thus be violated," the statement warns.

But analysts say that despite the recent polls suggesting increased approval of the president's performance, the PSUV coalition may not fare much better in Sunday's election than in its razor-thin win in April.

Some critics say a poor performance could lead to internal divisions within Chavismo..

But Mr Escalona thinks a partial defeat will only spur the PSUV on in its performance.

"If the PSUV loses the main cities, it means that they will have to do a better job in the future," he assures.

"Chavez's legacy still has a vital importance within Chavismo.. I don't see any reason for a political fracture. There are many reasons to remain united," he says.

Election analyst Eugenio Martinez agrees that the onus on Sunday is on the MUD:

"No matter the result, [Nicolas] Maduro will remain the president. But the MUD needs this victory to show its strength," he says.

That would be the normalized news with the proper "Common" words.

Now I will show you that same news but I will color in dark color every single line that contains a divisive word so you get an idea of the scope of the problem and the intentionality of that attack:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-25230752
7 December 2013 Last updated at 01:37 GMT
High stakes in Venezuela's municipal elections
By Irene Caselli
BBC News, Caracas

The stakes will be high for both the government and the opposition in Venezuela's municipal elections on Sunday.

According to David Smilde, a senior fellow at the Washington Office on Latin America, the results of the vote for mayors and town councillors will be a test of the government's popularity.

"This is the first election since April, when Nicolas Maduro just barely squeaked by," he says referring to April's presidential election when Mr Maduro won by an unexpectedly narrow margin of 1.5 percentage points.

The opposition, led by Henrique Capriles, contested the result, alleging there had been irregularities. But the National Electoral Council carried out a recount and declared the results valid.

Dividing forces

The country became more divided than ever in the wake of the vote.

Opposition supporters questioned the legitimacy of the new president, while Chavistas - as supporters of the late President Hugo Chavez are known - accused the opposition of trying to stage a coup.

The municipal elections could be an indication of how voters feel eight months on, but analysts think there is little chance of there being a clear winner.

"Both sides may be able to declare victory on 9 December, depending on what you define as victory," says Eugenio Martinez, an election analyst working for the
pro-opposition newspaper El Universal.

"There are 337 different elections on Sunday" he says referring to the number of mayoral posts up for grabs.

According to most polls, the
government coalition looks likely to win in a majority of municipalities.

What is less clear is whether it will be able to take control of the country's two largest cities, Caracas and Maracaibo.

Bigger picture

But both the government and the opposition have argued in their campaigns that Sunday is about much more than choosing local representatives.

From the start, the
opposition has portrayed the vote as a referendum on the performance of Mr Maduro, whom it blames for Venezuela's economic woes.

The government, on the other hand, wants to be able to show it can count on the support of the voters at a difficult economic time.

Victory is therefore important to both camps, but the stakes seem higher for the
opposition.

"The
opposition trapped itself," says Julio Escalona, Venezuela's Deputy Ambassador to the United Nations.

"They told their voters that these are decisive elections. But they may not win, and that would become a
serious political problem for them," he told BBC News in a telephone interview from New York City.

Mr Smilde also believes the opposition has been losing ground.

"Until the end of October, it looked like the
opposition was in the driver's seat," he says.

'Special
powers'

With an annual inflation rate of 54.3%, shortages of food staples and frequent power cuts, dissatisfaction with Mr Maduro had been on the rise.

"But then things changed," Mr Smilde explains.

In early November, the president ordered the seizure of a chain of electronics stores, accused them of overcharging, and forced them to
slash their prices.

Later that month, the National Assembly granted Mr Maduro special decree powers that allow him to pass laws without the assembly's approval for 12 consecutive months.

Polls suggest that soon after, a large majority of Venezuelans started viewing the president's work as positive, leaving the
opposition on shakier grounds.

A convincing victory for the government could spell the end of Mr Capriles as leader of the
opposition coalition, according to Mr Smilde.

Another defeat could make it hard for him to hold together the coalition of 30 often
divided parties.

'No fair play'

Ignacio Avalos, who heads the Venezuelan Electoral Observatory, a NGO which has often been critical of the government, says the opposition has been facing an added difficulty.

"The worry is that the campaign was
very uneven, there was no fair play," he says.

Among other things, Mr Maduro declared 8 December as a day to commemorate the memory of the late president Hugo Chavez.

The government says it chose 8 December as the "Day of Loyalty and Love towards Chavez and the Motherland" because it is the first anniversary of Mr Chavez's famous speech, when he announced the re-occurrence of his cancer and asked voters to pick Mr Maduro as the new president if he were not to return from cancer treatment in Cuba.

In a statement, the Venezuelan Electoral Council said Venezuelans "are facing the risk that the commemorative acts and events may become acts aiming at recruiting votes for the candidates supported by the executive
power".

"The principles of
equity and equality established in our legislation would thus be violated," the statement warns.

But analysts say that despite the recent polls suggesting increased approval of the president's performance, the
government coalition may not fare much better in Sunday's election than in its razor-thin win in April.

Some critics say a poor performance could lead to
internal divisions within Chavismo..

But Mr Escalona thinks a partial defeat will only spur the
government on in its performance.

"If the
government loses the main cities, it means that they will have to do a better job in the future," he assures.

"Chavez's legacy still has a vital importance within Chavismo.. I don't see any reason for a
political fracture. There are many reasons to remain united," he says.

Election analyst Eugenio Martinez agrees that the onus on Sunday is on the
opposition:

"No matter the result, [Nicolas] Maduro will remain the president. But the
opposition needs this victory to show its strength," he says.

As you could see, this is all that is left when all sentences that contain a divisive word are removed:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-25230752
7 December 2013 Last updated at 01:37 GMT
High stakes in Venezuela's municipal elections
By Irene Caselli
BBC News, Caracas

"There are 337 different elections on Sunday" he says referring to the number of mayoral posts up for grabs.

Bigger picture

'No fair play'

Among other things, Mr Maduro declared 8 December as a day to commemorate the memory of the late president Hugo Chavez.

FORTY TWO DIVISIVE PARTS!

All forty two divisive sections all on a single news...

Basically there was almost no single line that did not contain a divisive word.

But that is not all...

In Great Britain there are many news media and in the United States there is even more news media, probably thousands of them if you combine all the media of those two countries. But even if there are so many news media, far more than in Venezuela multiplied by 10 or 20 or more...

Why is it that ABSOLUTELY no media in the United States or in Great Britain are referred to as "Government" and even less as "Opposition"?

I can answer that question:

In the United States:

Republican Party = Conservatives.
Democratic party = Liberals.

In Great Britain:

Conservative and Unionist Party
Labour Party
Liberal Democrats

As you can see both have a Conservative and a Liberal Party.

Conservative and liberal of what?

Of the Philosophical System that is present both in the United States of America and Great Britain.

It is the same Philosophical systems that determine that using the word "Opposition" is HIGHLY DANGEROUS and DISRUPTIVE to society because it pushed the "opposition" to fall in conflict with the Government, which is the same as ANARCHY!!!

Of course the British media does not want any anarchy in Great Britain and the United States does not want any anarchy in the United States so the philosophical systems of those countries instruct their media not to use those dangerous words because it can cause serious disorder and anarchy problems at their countries.

That explains why even if there are probably THOUSANDS of news media in the United States and Great Britain combined, NONE of the media use the word "Opposition" for political purposes due to it's toxic nature because it greatly increases POLARIZATION and thus CORRUPTION.

See for yourself.

Spain's Efe Agency:
http://www.noticierodigital.com/2013/12/efe-oposicion-venezolana-llega-a-las-elecciones-con-desgaste-y-mucho-en-juego/
EFE: Oposición venezolana llega a las elecciones con desgaste y mucho en juego
2 Diciembre, 2013

Caracas, 2 dic (EFE) / Inés Guzmán.- La oposición marcha a las municipales entre dudas sobre cómo ser alternativa al chavismo, golpeada por la pérdida de sus principales tribunas mediáticas, un cerco a su financiamiento y el desgaste de su electorado, pero con él ánimo de capitalizar la mala situación económica en Venezuela.

Ya sin el fallecido presidente Hugo Chávez como principal antagonista y mayor motivo de cohesión, la oposición intenta convertir las elecciones del 8 de diciembre en un plebiscito a la gestión del presidente Nicolás Maduro.

-The rest was suppressed-

AFP of Spain:
http://elregional.net.ve/2011/11/afp-oposicion-venezolana-preparada-para-unas-elecciones-sin-chavez/
AFP: Oposición venezolana preparada para unas elecciones sin Chávez

La oposición venezolana está preparada para enfrentar en las elecciones de 2012 a un candidato del gobierno distinto del mandatario Hugo Chávez, quien asegura recuperarse de un cáncer, dijo este martes el portavoz de la coalición de fuerzas opositores en Brasilia.

-The rest was suppressed-

Reuters of Great Britain:
http://www.noticias24.com/venezuela/noticia/130185/reuters-oposicion-venezolana-pierde-la-presidencia-pero-gana-un-lider/
Reuters: oposición venezolana pierde la presidencia pero gana un líder

Publicado el 08 de oct de 2012 8:03 am

(Caracas, 8 de octubre. Reuters) – Derrotado, triste y ojeroso, Henrique Capriles recibió el domingo su primera derrota electroral en Venezuela, ante Hugo Chávez, pero, quizá sin saberlo, logró algo que la oposición buscaba tanto como el poder: un líder.

-The rest was suppressed-

Associated Press of the United States:
http://www.noticias24.com/venezuela/noticia/185913/ap-oposicion-venezolana-llevara-la-batalla-por-la-impugnacion-del-14-a-al-exterior/
AP: oposición venezolana llevará la “batalla” por la impugnación del 14-A al exterior

Publicado el 08 de ago de 2013 4:14 pm

(Caracas / Venezuela – AP).— La oposición venezolana se prepara para llevar a instancias internacionales la denuncia sobre un supuesto fraude en las pasadas elecciones presidenciales, mientras descarta que los recientes procesos judiciales iniciados contra algunas prominentes figuras puedan debilitarla de cara a los comicios de alcaldes y concejales de diciembre.

Bloomberg of the United States:
http://www.empresate.org/economia/bloomberg-barclays-cree-un-cambio-probable-en-venezuela-a-diferencia-de-bank-of-america-y-jpmorgan/
Bloomberg: Barclays cree un cambio probable en Venezuela, a diferencia de Bank of America y JPMorgan

Hecho por: Nestor Borjas

Hugo Chávez, candidato presidencial a la reelección por tercera vez y presidente actual de Venezuels, “es bastante probable” que pierda las elecciones de este fin de semana, lo que provocó un rally de bonos, según dijo Barclays Plc, luego que un sondeo mostró que el candidato opositor Henrique Capriles Radonski amplió su ventaja.El liderazgo de Capriles creció a casi 5 puntos porcentuales por encima de Chávez, en una encuesta realizada por Consultores 21, de este 2 de octubre, con un 51,8 por ciento de los venezolanos que dijeron estar seguro de votar apoyando el candidato de la oposición. Chávez contó con el apoyo del 47,2 por ciento. El sondeo entre 1.546 personas realizada entre septiembre 27 y 02 de octubre tuvo un margen de error de 2,5 puntos porcentuales.

CNN of the United States:
http://cnnespanol.cnn.com/2013/11/23/la-oposicion-marcha-contra-el-gobierno-de-maduro-en-calles-de-venezuela/
La oposición marcha contra el gobierno de Maduro en calles de Venezuela

(CNNMéxico) - Decenas de miles de venezolanos marcharon este sábado en todo el país en protesta por la alta inflación y la escasez de productos básicos, a sólo dos semanas de unas elecciones municipales vistas como un termómetro de la popularidad del presidente Nicolás Maduro.

Those agencies are also the main provider of news for all of Venezuelan media...

Why is it that if Conservatives do not allow anarchy words to be used in the United States and in Great Britain they massively spread them to a country like Venezuela even if they know it is dangerous?

The answer is:

To help avoid that a country achieves Academic Independence and starts questioning the media tyranny. In other words, Intellectual SLAVERY.

As the innocent in Philosophy country, my country reads junk that is extremely polarizing and unethical, it also lacks the proper Academic Systems to reunite the country, which causes great psychological pain to the people caused by the Bigotry and the hatred also generates a lot of violence in society and in the family core, ideological violence that then turns into CRIME that ends up KILLING MY PEOPLE.

Yes there are many sick with extreme hate planted by criminal media, but they do not represent the country in Universal Philosophy, I am the Academic Guardian of Venezuela.

What is happening in Venezuela is a provoked, deliberate, planned: MASS MURDER and my people are suffering greatly and even more when it is almost forbidden to analyze the criminal media which takes Bigotry and thus corruption to extreme levels.

I have just given you proof that the crime is VERY DELIBERATE, that the BBC uses CRIMINAL METHODS that are systematic and methodical to incite DIVISION and BIGOTRY in Venezuela, thus CORRUPTION and CRIME.

That explains why Efe for example published an impressive amount of crime news on Globovision.
That explains why Agencies deliberately support extremely corrupt people and even convicted criminals.
That explains why they frequently question Venezuela's Judicial system to try to weaken it.

It's called: Mind Crime.

That is why, once again I insist:

Academic Independence and Academic Media is the solution.

They will stop their BRUTAL PSYCHOLOGICAL TORTURE.

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